“Weaponisation of an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon” – An Amazing New Rendlesham Forest Book

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“Weaponisation of an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon” – An Amazing New Rendlesham Forest Book

Back in May of this year Lisa Hagan Books published my book, The Rendlesham Forest UFO Conspiracy. It’s a book that suggests the strange events that took place in those English woods in December 1980 had nothing to do with aliens, but everything to do with secret, military experiments. Taking into consideration the fact that this December is the 40th anniversary of the famous event, I figured that at least a couple more new books on the subject would surface. I wasn’t wrong. In September, Rendlesham to Redemption: A Story of Transformation appeared. The author is Steven R. LaPlume. He was one of those involved in the controversial affair. I haven’t seen LaPlume’s book yet, but I will be reviewing it soon. There is, however, yet another new Rendlesham-themed book that I’m focusing on today. The title of the book is: Weaponisation of an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon.

The author is John F. Burroughs. If you know your Rendlesham history, you will know that John – along with Jim Penniston and Charles Halt – was one of the key figures in the whole story. In other words, this is a book that – if you have an interest in the Rendlesham Forest saga – you will definitely want to read. In fact, I would say the book makes for absolutely essential reading. A month or so ago, me and John discussed the idea of me doing a review of his book to coincide with its publication. John thought it was a great idea. So did I. As a result, and in no time at all, John sent me a PDF of the manuscript. I read the whole book – absorbed, I have to say. John’s book is a definitive page-turner. Whatever your thoughts on the 1980 incidents are, you are most assuredly going to want to read this one. With all of that now said, let’s get onto the content of the book.

I must say that you may be surprised by some of the things that John has to say, and particularly so in relation to what did – or what didn’t – occur. But, we’ll get to all of that shortly. As the book begins, we are treated to a good, solid introduction to John’s life and his career in the U.S. military – and also how he came to be at the Royal Air Force Bentwaters base on the night(s) that his life was changed. John makes it very clear that he is not entirely certain of what happened to him. In his very own words, John says: “Penniston and I cannot be sure our memories are accurate. We can be certain that we think they are, but between the likely power of the real phenomenon to alter reality and the effects of sophisticated debriefing techniques, we can’t be sure that what we think happened, did.” There’s no doubt that is a brave statement for John to make. And particularly so, because much of what John has to say relates to secret, government experiments of the type I present in my own Rendlesham book. Indeed, John makes it clear that in the area there was “very exotic EW [electronic warfare] and radar technologies at play in East Anglia at the time.” John expands on all of this: “What did we encounter? Advanced technology developed in a special access program project intended to produce altered-perception of reality in the enemy?” Whatever the answer, John explains that what he personally encountered was not a “terrifying experience.” Rather,  he makes clear, it was an “inexplicable experience.”

Photo by Nick Redfern

John also notes the long history of secret experimentation that has taken place very close to Rendlesham Forest, such as the legendary “Shingle Street” affair, the development of secret radar-based experiments, the work of a certain British Telecom facility, and “classified weapons used for deception and perception management.” That’s to say, John is treading on undeniably controversial ground, to be sure. Even more controversial are the following words from John: “Young airmen were subjected to truth serums combined with hypnosis. Some were handed their statements pretyped and told ‘this is the story you will tell when asked.’”  The stories of Larry Warren and Adrian Bustinza become parts of the sensational story, too. Certain words and names – such as Cobra Mist, Marconi, Harold Puthoff, Kit Green, the Berwyn Mountains, Ball Lightning, Plasmas, Tesla, Lasers, Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, Acoustic Mind-Control, and Project Condign – will soon become familiar to you as you dig further into the pages of John’s book. There’s way more, too. A man named Ron Haddow – who you can find more about at this link, and who worked for the U.K. Ministry of Defense for years – becomes one of the players, as does a certain Ralph Noyes. The latter being a man who knew a lot, but preferred to keep his mouth shut on certain, sensitive topics. Noyes, too, spent years working for the U.K.’s M.O.D. I could go on and on, such is the sheer body of fascinating material that, to some degree, places the whole affair in new light.

It’s perhaps apt for me to end the review with the following statement from John. He says that his primary goal, today, is, and I quote: “Helping my fellow veterans get the kind of support they need and deserve for their service to our country’s ideals if they can’t get it because, like me, they were a pawn in a highly classified game.”

Weaponisation of an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon will be available on December 16 in Kindle version.

Source: Mysterious Universe

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